Blog

Guest blog by Benet Heames

According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, “Health spending is projected to grow from 17.5% of our National Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2014 to 20.1% by 2025.” In 2014, the 17.5% was $3 Trillion of our National GDP.!

The rise in our healthcare expenditures over the next 10 years is something we will all be paying for, either through insurance premiums, taxes, or from one’s actual expenses for care. Unfortunately, the entire healthcare model in America is not what you would call “price transparent.” This is one of the major flaws in a system that has been slowly built since WWII.

There are a number of reasons why price transparency is lacking in our system, but it does relate to the fact that we have a third party payer – either an insurance company or Government program – paying a majority of the cost of the care we receive. Going back to the 80’s and 90’s, consumer’s were covered under insurance plans that paid full cost from day one. The consumer had no idea what the cost was and was not on the financial hook for a procedure. Thus, the consumer said yes to most procedures whether needed or not, irregardless of the actual cost of the procedures! Think of this model like an all you can eat buffet, but for your healthcare needs.

The reason for these first dollar indemnity plan designs stemmed from employers trying to use these benefits to recruit/retain employees, and insurance companies trying to win business with richer plan designs and lower premiums. Clearly, this is not sustainable…

Unfortunately, these plans led to high utilization across all services that simply were too expensive to continue. The mid-90’s saw many health insurance companies going out of business or merging with other systems. Eventually, the remaining and now larger insurance companies had to create other plan designs and networks that had cost containment, so they created Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO’s) and introduced deductibles and co-pays to help contain some of the cost.

Strangely enough, today we are seeing mega-mergers between our largest health insurance companies (Cigna + Anthem) along with increased complexity and compliance due to ACA Reforms. It all comes down to how you will be spending your healthcare dollars…

Today, you will recognize the Consumer-Driven Health Plan (CDHP), which incorporates a rather large deductible up front. It is called consumer-driven because it is up to the consumer to determine how to spend your money – so be aware of what the cost actually is! You are on the hook and it is OK to ask, “what is this going to cost?”

The bigger question will be, can your Doctor give you the real time cash price for what the service will cost?

Healthcare is not an “all you can eat – or pay for” buffet!

Wednesday’s Workout
Practice

A)
Running skill sessionB)
5 RFQT
1 Snatch deadlift (55-65% 1RM Snatch)
2 Squat snatches
3 Overhead squats
20 Skater hops
–Unbroken rounds–

C)
QAMRAP 10
10 Single-leg Lateral hops-R
10 Single-leg Lateral hops-L
10 Alt Balancing tripod transitions

Thursday’s Workout
Practice
A)
Front squat (Use True 2RM)
75% x 3
80% x 3
85% x 3+B)
E2MO2M 12
1: 20 Handstand pushups
2: 20 Kipping pullups
3: 20 Thrusters (35-40%)
–1min Cap each round–

Then, FQ
1250m Run

Comments

comments

We are please to announce that our 3rd annual, in-house competition is coming!

What: Buddy Battle 2016 – 3-WOD partner competition
When: Saturday, Oct 1st – Athlete check-in is at 7:45am (The day will run until around 1pm)
Partners: The competition is partner format. Same-gender partners will comprise a team.
Categories: There will be an Rx division and a Party division. For anyone who needs to scale weight or movements during the Party workouts may do so. Just tell your judge beforehand.
Cost: $100/Team – $120/Team for late registration after Sept 22nd

The first workout will be announced Sept 15th.

The Buddy Battle is the ideal time to bring a little competition into your life with a friend and within a safe and accepting environment. The event is charged with energy with a healthy mix of fun, bad assery, and plenty of nerves. For many who have filled out a CFLA Athlete Profile, the Buddy Battle remains a highlight in their CFLA experience.

Get your partner – and get in the game!
Sign up sheet are in the main gym!

 


Tuesday’s Workout
Competition 

“Diz”
5 RFT
5 Bar muscleups
15 MB Sit-to-sands (20/14)
300m Run
–20min Cap–

Wednesday’s Workout
Practice

A)
Running skill session

B)
5 RFQT
1 Snatch deadlift (55-65% 1RM Snatch)
2 Squat snatches
3 Overhead squats
20 Skater hops
–Unbroken rounds–

C)
AMRAP 10
10 Single-leg Lateral hops-R
10 Single-leg Lateral hops-L
10 Alt Balancing tripod transitions

 

Comments

comments

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) FQD
Box squat broad jumps
8 x 3
–Record best of each set–

B) 4 RFQR on the 5:00
20s Side plank-R
20s Side plank-L
10 Strict dips
Row for cal
–2:30 Cap each round–

And Coming Tuesday
Competition

“Diz”
5 RFT
5 Bar muscleups
15 MB Sit-to-sands (20/14)
300m Run
–20min Cap–

Comments

comments

This Labor Day, we’re straying away from the traditional indoor Trevor Win’E Labor Day Dress Up event and we’re taking the workout outside. We live in paradise, people. And we want to take advantage of that fact more. I don’t think we’ll do anything like the stunts in this video, but it’s fun to watch nonetheless.

Come play on Labor Day!

Labor Day Outside WOD:
What: Fun, outdoor workout with Kenny. Lil running, lil bodyweight stuff, lil work in the sand.
When: Well, Labor Day. Monday, Sept 5
Time: 9am until about 10:30am
Where: Meet at Palisades Park at Ocean Avenue and Montana Avenue.
Why: Because, paradise.
No regular classes Labor Day

Get your workout done then go BBQ with family and friends! Or whatever you like to do.


Friday’s Workout
Practice

A)
FQD
7 x 1
Broad jump
–Record best and average–

B)
FQT
200m Run
40 Lateral hops
21 Handstand pushups
–1min Rest–
200m Run
40 Lateral hops
15 Handstand pushups
–1min Rest–
200m Run
40 Lateral hops
9 Handstand pushups

Saturday’s Workout

5 RFT
100 Double unders
20 Wallballs (20/14)
200m MB carry

Sunday’s Workout

“Spartan That”

AMRAP 40

800m Run (Row 1000m)
3 Rope Climbs
20 Air Squats
20 Pull Ups
20 Box Jump Overs (20/12)

1 x Through the Unknown Obstacle Course

 

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A)
FQD
Box squat broad jumps
8 x 3
–Record best of each set–

B)
4 RFQR on the 5:00
20s Side plank-R
20s Side plank-L
10 Strict dips
Row for cal
–2:30 Cap each round–

 

Comments

comments

With kids classes starting up again in under a month, I wanted to share a little bit about why I coach kids. The easiest place for me to start is what I appreciate about them. They are honest, authentic, fearless and usually full of joy. These are just a few characteristics that I value, they are also characteristics that I see in a lot of the kids I work with. These alone bring me so much joy and allow me to continue to do what I do.

Honesty and authenticity: Most kids don’t hide what they are feeling, which is something I truly appreciate. They don’t try to pretend they like you if they don’t or tell you they are happy when they are sad. Most kids will just be their true self, which is one of the best ways to be.

Fearlessness: I admire this because a lot of my life has been run by fear.   In CrossFit my fear of getting upside down is still a thing for me sometimes.  I have found that most kids are super stoked to try something new and are full of courage. Ask a kid to to perform box jumps, they say no problem. Handstands? Sure, I’ll try it. Cartwheel? Great, looks like fun!

Joy: Most children are full of joy and happiness. It’s truly in their nature to receive love and to give it also.  Most see no reason to hurt someone or not to have fun, this in itself is beautiful and refreshing. I appreciate their care free state and open heart.

I could list a lot more things, and of course a few challenges too, but I’ll close with just a few more thoughts.  I think seeing kids grow and learn is magical. It’s fun to see a kid try something new, succeed then want to try it again.  It’s also wonderful watching them work very hard and make progress and see changes from all the work they have put in. In my kids program I work with a variety of different types of kids. I have the opportunity to get to know them, find out what drives them and push them to make progress while having fun.  If you have a kid or know one who’s looking to grow, send them my way please.

Kids Fall 2016 session
10 weeks
Sept 12- Nov 19th
Teen Classes ages 13-17, Monday and Wednesday afternoon
Kids Classes ages 5-12, Tuesday and/or Thursday afternoon and Saturday am


Today’s Workout
Mental Toughness

“The Pain Train”

3 RFT
20 Unbroken thrusters (95/65)
800m MB Run (20/14)
–Courtesy Alex Bentley–
–Restart the 20 thrusters if bar is dropped–

And Coming Friday
Practice

A) FQD
7 x 1
Broad jump
–Record best and average–

B) FQT
200m Run
40 Lateral hops
21 Handstand pushups
–1min Rest–
200m Run
40 Lateral hops
15 Handstand pushups
–1min Rest–
200m Run
40 Lateral hops
9 Handstand pushups

Comments

comments

Guest post by Benet Heames

Over the next few weeks, I will be writing a few guest posts related to Health Care in America. I have been involved in the insurance/employee benefits space for my entire career, and the last 8 years have seen some pretty tremendous change (think PPACA/Obamacare). With all of the change to the system, I find it frustrating that our overall health as American’s is still not improving. Childhood obesity is on the rise and a majority of our nation’s spend on healthcare is on diseases and conditions that are largely preventable.

You might be wondering, “Isn’t this a Crossfit blog?” Sure, but our “prescription of fitness” is one of the most logical and viable solutions for all of us. The work we do in the gym helps extend the quality of our lives and prevents many of the non-communicable diseases that are actually driving health care spend. (Note – more on NCD’s and the impact to our health care spend in the next post)

Regardless of your view and opinions politically about our system, most people don’t know the history of how we got here. I find this to be fascinating and have been reading “Reinventing American Health Care,” by Ezekiel Emanuel. In it, he lays out a great historical narrative of how the system that we know today came to be.

For starters, I will focus on the Employer based system that we know today. Why do employers (some, not all) offer health insurance as a benefit?

There are some earlier elements that existed before WWII, but this is generally seen as the birthplace of our system. Because of the war, there was a labor shortage – so workers demanded higher pay. Congress and then President Roosevelt passed the “Stabilization Act of 1942” which required wages and prices be locked in on Sept 15, 1942. The day after this was passed, President Roosevelt issued an executive order that excluded insurance benefits from the control. So an employer could now offer a type of health insurance as a benefit to attract workers!

Jumping ahead a few years and in 1954, the IRS gave the employer based health care system the final piece that it needed to become institutionalized in America – the tax exclusion. Basically, the cost of health insurance was not part of the worker’s income.

This combination of exempting insurance from wage controls during WWII, and then giving it a tax break firmly planted the employer sponsored health care system in America.

Next week, I will dig into what we actually spend our health care dollars on!


Wednesday’s Workout
Practice

A)
Front squat (Use True 2RM)
75% x 5
80% x 5
85% x 5+

B)
5 RFQR (30s:30s)
Hanging L-sit hold
Squat snatches (55%)
Balancing foot hand crawl

Thursday’s Workout
Mental Toughness

“The Pain Train”

3 RFT
20 Unbroken thrusters (95/65)
800m MB Run (20/14)
–Courtesy Alex Bentley–
–Restart the 20 thrusters if bar is dropped–

 

Comments

comments

During the men’s Olympic marathon on Sunday, the world’s top contenders bunched at the start line. World Champion Ghebreslassie from Eritera was there, ready. American Galin Rupp was nervously waiting, ready. Kipchoge from Kenya, considered the most prolific marathoner of our time, was definitely ready. As was the American fan-favorite, 41 year old Meb Keflezighi, last Olympic’s silver medalist. They shook out their limbs. They looked ahead of them in a semi-focused stare playing the race plan through their minds again. They had trained months — years — for this moment. It was time to test their training. It was time to push the edge to get on the podium.

For the first 10k, all hummed along as expected. There were sixty top contenders still in the lead group. At 20k, the top pack was still strong, but down to forty-eight runners. But at the half -way mark, things started to fall apart. A top medal contender from Ethiopa, Tesfaye Abera, was suddenly off the course, hugging a tree. He retired from the race. World champ Ghebreslassie fell back off the lead pack. American Meb dropped way back, now besieged with stomach problems. Over the course of the next thirteen miles, he stopped seven times to vomit or dry heave.

It seems that no matter how much you prepare for one day, one race, one PR, it sometimes is just not your day. This is true at the very top of the elite athletic world. And this is certainly true on test days and competition days at humble ol’ CFLA. When you’re prepared, you bring the chances down exponentially of things going wrong. But sometimes the wheels fall off no matter what.

Galin Rupp’s coach Alberto Salazar said, “Running a marathon is in many ways an imponderable exercise. No matter how thoroughly you prepare, there is always an element of discovery and surprise, sometimes gratifying; more often, unfortunately, otherwise.”

Meb, who says he will not compete in another Olympics, had a more gracious approach to his off day: “This is the best victory lap ever,” he said. “You can see [runners from] India, Ecuador, Peru, Costa Rica, Cuba. All those guys. I enjoyed every bit of it.”

Meb had been instrumental in reviving American distance running, which hit a low point in 2000. “That dream has come true for me,” he said. “And to be part of it and witness it is a huge reward. I feel honored to be a part of it.”

On top of all the stomach issues, Meb slipped in rain puddle and crashed to the ground just as he was about to cross the finish line of Sunday’s marathon. In true master-of-the-silver-lining fashion, Meb stayed on the ground and did three push ups before he hopped to his feet to cross the line, waving to the crowd. Crap happens, but who are you when things get crappy? I decided then, even after watching a beautiful performance by the winner Kipchoge, that I wanna be like Meb.


 Tuesday’s Workout
Practice

A)
Running Skill Session

B)
3 RFQT of 3 unbroken circuits
3 DB Deadlifts (60% 1RM Strict Press)
3 DB Hang power cleans
3 DB Thrusters
–1min Rest between rounds–

C)
4 RFQT
7 MB Seated Chest throws (20/14)
14 Kipping Dips
7 Strict Pullups

Wednesday’s Workout
Practice

A)
Front squat (Use True 2RM)
75% x 5
80% x 5
85% x 5

B)
5 RFQR (30s:30s)
Hanging L-sit hold
Squat snatches (55%)
Balancing foot hand crawl

Comments

comments

Check out this lovely video from dear Kenny to see how clean the sidewalks in Sweden are. Also, you are going to want to hear Kenny’s words, as they are a preview of Cycle 12’s big themes.

<3


Monday’s Workout
Competition

AMRAP 12
6 Bar muscleups
9 Clean and jerks (115/75)
12 Back Squats

And Coming Tuesday
Practice

A)
Running Skill Session

B)
3 RFQT of 3 unbroken circuits
3 DB Deadlifts (60% 1RM Strict Press)
3 DB Hang power cleans
3 DB Thrusters
–1min Rest between rounds–

C)
4 RFQT
7 MB Seated Chest throws (20/14)
14 Kipping Dips
7 Strict Pullups

 

Comments

comments

“When you spot a giant ability gap between ages and genders, you know you’re looking at nurture, not nature,” writes Christopher McDougall in his new book Natural Born Heroes and author of the wildly popular Born to Run. In this particular part of the book, McDougall is hanging out with two infamous British “gutter fighters” while researching real-life survival tactics. His book’s general, underlying theme is that we do not have to be massive or technically the strongest person in the room to out-fight someone — or fend off a larger attacker. Or to be a hero. And the advantage of a smaller person is not necessarily intelligence, but physiological as well if we (re)learn to access a natural, innate ability to use our body better.

These gutter fighters, “The Twins” as they are called in the book, who apparently could win any “real street” fight against anyone, expound the theory stating that a big ability gap between men and women is cultural and based on a perception specific to humans more than reality. “Male and female geese differ in size but not in speed; otherwise migration would be mayhem. Same with trout: if males rocketed past females, they’d always be first to eat, last to be eaten, and on their way to a disastrous shortage of spawning partners.”

This idea is fascinating mainly because girls — especially girls and women in industrialized societies — are regarded as delicate and near fragile. And the reality is that women’s natural abilities, which are similar to men, have faded because we’ve adapted to cultural norms where we are not encouraged to use our original, natural resources as much.

“Compared with other animals, men and women are remarkably alike. We’re roughly the same size and shape, and share the same biological weaponry. Men aren’t specially equipped with horns, fangs, or giant racks of antlers, like the males of other species, and they don’t dwarf women; men are only about 15% bigger, not 50%, like male gorillas. We need to be similar because for most of our existence we shared similar jobs.” The last few hundred years, when cultural perceptions changed, are only a blip in that time line.

And not all is forgotten within our DNA: “We’re creatures of restraint — of endurance and elasticity –and that’s where men and women, old and young, are most alike. When it comes to tests of endurance, like distance running and swimming, the performance difference between ages and genders is even smaller than the difference in our size; it’s only about 10%.”

“Anatomically, (and with practice) there’s no reason the average woman can’t throw a ball as hard as the average man. Strength and physique aren’t the issue; when researchers tested Aboriginal Australian girls who grow up hunting alongside boys, they found the difference in top-end throwing velocity was only about 20%. … A reason women don’t generally throw as well as men, it seems, is because they don’t throw as much.”

McDougall’s book Natural Born Heroes is a fascinating read for many reasons beyond this particular research. But these pages struck a cord personally. I spent a big part of my life fighting my way into games and explaining to people that I would be just fine doing … whatever: playing pick up ball with guys, moving furniture myself, carrying out my own dog food for god’s sake. And I’ve spent an equal amount of time fiercely clearing a path for my daughters to bravely do whatever they’ve wanted athletically — and otherwise. It’s nice to read that it really has been perceptions that limit us most of all. Instinctually the brave ones already know this. Busting through limiting perceptions is obviously not confined to women nor is it just men putting it upon women. It’s includes any group that feels marginalized by untruths. Sometimes we’ve heard a false story so long, we believe it ourselves. Changing others’ perception is a long, brave fight. But starting with ourselves will be the most liberating of all.


Friday’s Workout
Test Week

“TPT”

4 RFT
30s Parralette hold
15 Kipping ring dips
15 Double lateral burpees
–1min Rest between rounds–
–20min Cap–

Saturday’s Workout

“Team WOD/Teams of 2
3/4 “”Juggernaut””
15 min AMRAP
75 Burpees
75 Power Cleans (135/95)
75 Box Jump Overs (24″”/20″”)

*One partner working at a time
**Partners may position reps however they’d like, however the non-working partner must be in the designated resting position in order for the reps to count.

DESIGNATED RESTING POSITIONS:
Burpees – Hold barbell overheard (135/95)
Power Cleans – Hanging from the pull up bar
Box Jump Overs – Plank from the elbows”

Sunday’s Workout

“Running On Empty”

3RFT
20 Lateral Box Skip Overs / Burpees
20 Ring Rows
20 DB Push Press (35/20)
20 Alt. Jump Lunges (Single Ct.)
20 Sit Ups
400m Run

Monday’s Workout
Competition Day

AMRAP 12
6 Bar muscleups
9 Clean and jerks (115/75)
12 Back Squats

 

Comments

comments

17 Aug / 2016

Cycle 12

Welcome to Cycle 12! As usual we are starting with Test Week, measuring many different types of fitness by testing multiple energy pathways. See the end of this post for the five tests for this cycle.

A few things we will focus on during this cycle are:

  • Run Technique. There will be running drills on at least one Practice Day per week, and running in workouts on at least one Practice Day per week.
  • Front Squat. There will be one front squat day per week, and the load will get heavier throughout the cycle.
  • Explosiveness. In addition to building strength and developing explosiveness through things like squatting and olympic lifting, we will focus specifically on explosiveness by training things like broad jumps, vertical jumps, depth jumps, med ball throws, plyo pushups, etc
  • Bodyweight Stability/Control. There will be at least one Practice Day per week with static or isometric hold work. Think planks, L-sits, etc.

These things will show up on different days throughout each week. Keep an eye on the programming to see the specifics.

And here is the entire Test Week!

MONDAY – Test your capacity for activities lasting a few minutes.
FR

0:00 – 3:00
500/400/300m TrueForm
Max Thrusters (95/65)

3:00 – 8:00
Rest

8:00 – 10:00
300/250/200m TrueForm
Max Kipping pullups

TUESDAY – Test your capacity for activities lasting a few seconds.
0:00 – 15:00
FD
1-step MB Chest toss (20/14)

15:00 – 18:00
Transition

18:00 – 43:00
FL
2RM Front Squat

WEDNESDAY – Test your capacity for activities lasting 20-40min.
FT
1250m Run
3 20ft Balancing foot hand crawls
9 Squat snatches (135/95)
27 Handstand pushups
800m Run
2 20ft Balancing foot hand crawls
6 Squat snatches (135/95)
18 Handstand pushups
400m Run
1 20ft Balancing foot hand crawls
3 Squat snatches (135/95)
9 Handstand pushups
–35min Cap–

THURSDAY – Test your capacity for activities lasting 6-15min.
2 RFT
500m Row
2 Rounds “DT”* (155/115)
–12min cap–

*”DT”
12 Deadlifts
9 Hang power cleans
6 Power jerks

FRIDAY – Test your capacity for bodyweight movements.
“TPT”

4 RFT
30s Parralette hold
15 Kipping ring dips
15 Double lateral burpees
–1min Rest between rounds–
–20min Cap–


Thursday’s Workout
Test

2 RFT
500m Row
2 Rounds “DT”* (155/115)
–12min cap–

*”DT”
12 Deadlifts
9 Hang power cleans
6 Power jerks

And Coming Friday
Test

“TPT”

4 RFT
30s Parralette hold
15 Kipping ring dips
15 Double lateral burpees
–1min Rest between rounds–
–20min Cap–

Comments

comments


1 2 3 4 333
Subscribe to Blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Search

Blog Archives

Find Us on Facebook