(Brief) History of New Year’s

(Brief) History of New Year’s

On New Year’s Eve, you’re dressed to the nines — or maybe in pajamas like I usually am on NYE — and clinking champagne (or eating chocolate chip cookies), and throwing around sparkly paper, maybe blowing horns, and yelling, and kissing — and in these shiny moments before midnight you might completely take for granted that New Year’s Eve or New Years or even the month of January used to not be a thing. Well, four thousand years ago the Babylonians had sort of a new year/new moon mystical deal that lasted 11 days. A sky god and an evil sea goddess were involved … neither here nor there now.

But it was good ol Julius Caesar who was like, hey, I’m going to make the calendar however I like because there were a few versions at the time and Julius really thought highly of himself. In his calendar reform, he instituted January 1 as the first day of the year to honor Janus, the Roman god of beginnings, whose two faces allowed him to look back into the past and forward into the future.

New Year’s is rooted in new beginnings. Different periods and cultures came up with their versions of resolutions as a result. Heck, even the Babylonians way back before Caesar made promises to their gods at the start of each year — when their calendar ruled — that they would return borrowed objects and pay their debts.  That’s one of my resolutions, too!

It’s popular now to poo-poo resolutions during New Year’s — like we shouldn’t wait until — or only — at the first of the year to resolve to make things better; we should always be working on things and, sure, that’s fair, but January is literally named after the god of new beginnings. It’s hard to fight that kind of pull to a fresh start, amiright? My point is that New Year’s and January is as good a time as any to make another good go at something you’ve always wanted.


Tuesday’s Workout

30 Butterfly Abmat Situps
15 Wallballs
2 Ali shuffles

B) 3 RFQ
50 Double unders
3 Squat cleans (80%)

Wednesday’s Workout

Front squat

B) 4 RFQR (:45:15)
Forward rolls
RKB Swings
Ring rows




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