Making a Difference, One Kid at a Time

Making a Difference, One Kid at a Time


FRIDAY’S WORKOUT (NO CAP)
COMPETITION

“Pinball Scores”
Section 1
A) In 2 mins max reps of sit to stands (full lockout stand)
rest exactly 3 mins
B) 2 mins max total lbs Sq. Cl.
– athletes choose weight of barbell
– multiply reps by lbs on bar
*Multiply part A (sit to stands) and B (total lbs cleaned) for Section 1 score.

Rest exactly 5 mins after Sq. Cleans

Section 2:
A) 2 Min Max reps pullups
rest exactly 3 min
B) 2 min max lbs STO (shoulder to overhead)
– multiply reps by lbs on bar
*Multiply part A and B for Section 2 score.

Add section 1 and 2 scores for pinball scores.

AND COMING MONDAY (NO CAP)
PRACTICE

A) BS 3×5 (87.5%-90%)
B) 5 rds on 4 for time and weight of:
10 strict chin ups
10 TTB
200m run
3 Push Press (from ground)
*All work must be done by 3:00A guest post from Coach Danette Rivera:

What would life have been like if you had started CrossFit as a kid? I often wonder the same. Would I have been a faster, better basketball player? Would my ankles have been a little stronger and less susceptible to injury? Or would I have simply had fun running around and learning how to lift weights, feeling more self confident and reaping all the health benefits unbeknownst to me?

Not many CrossFit gyms actually have a kids’ programs and it makes me appreciate even more what we’ve built here at CFLA as it really reflects the same care and thought put into the adult program.

I recently wrote an article for Breaking Muscle about how CrossFit is for every kid no matter the shape, size, background, or reasons for doing it. Below is an excerpt about one of my 14 year old students, Natalie, who is in our teen Prodigy program and who was suffering from severe scoliosis.

“Her condition was so bad that the lateral bend in her back was visible as she stood, even more noticeable when she held the top of a plank. Her mother had come to me seven months ago, not without concern, to get her daughter stronger for her upcoming spinal surgery (insertion of two metal rods). She believed more strength would help her recover faster and ease her pain. I agreed. The doctors told her the recovery from surgery would be long and hard, probably about eight months.

Though shy at first, this girl became a faithful student. She was always first to show up for class, and the more she came, the more she opened up. She was embarrassed that at first she could not do a single push up, not even from her knees, but I told her not to worry we’d get her there or get close. I scaled workouts to whatever she needed. When she felt pain, she stopped until ready. The whole time she was working, it was side-by-side with the other kids, never feeling apart from the others, no different from any other kid in class, including the ones bound for collegiate sports glory. And every one treated her that way, too. By the time she left for her surgery a few weeks ago, her pushups had improved one hundred percent and she nearly got a pull up, to which the entire class almost fell on the floor with excitement while she nearly burst with pride!

She had her surgery in April. It was a huge success. Her mother said thanks to her new strength she was able to pull herself up in the hospital bed more easily and was able to lower herself when going to the bathroom without help from a nurse. ‘Thanks to squats!’ she beamed.

And it’s those things we take for granted – our health and our capacity to simply ‘do life stuff’ that are so important. It’s not necessarily about crushing an opponent on the tennis court, improving a 100m sprint by tenths of a second, or even getting a pull up. For this girl, this was about living a better life, a stronger life, one filled with less pain. The doctors have been so thrilled with her progress that their original eight-month recovery estimate was revised down to six. A couple kids from her class and I visited her after her surgery and all she talked about was how she couldn’t wait to get back to CrossFit. Her mom said it was the only thing she looked forward to. ‘Well, good,’ I said. ‘Because we’re holding your spot on the team until then.’” (Read the full article here http://breakingmuscle.com/crossfit/why-crossfit-is-for-every-kid)

Our CFLA Kids program is an amazing one. Take advantage of it! Bring your kids to try out a class in one of our three programs: Lil Champs (ages 5-8), Champs (ages 9-12), and Prodigy (ages 12-17). As a member you also receive a 20% discount when signing your kids up. Email [email protected] or [email protected] for more information.

CrossFitLA Image

Comments

comments

Subscribe to Blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Search

Blog Archives

Find Us on Facebook